Saturday, June 25, 2005

Taming the Balkans - The Economist

Taming the Balkans

Could EU accession do the trick?

FOR a gruelling decade, the world viewed the Balkans through the prism of the region's most strife-torn country, says Ivan Krastev, a Bulgarian political scientist. In the early 1990s that country was Croatia or Bosnia. By 1999 it was Kosovo, illuminated by the bombing of Belgrade. Two years later attention shifted to Macedonia, brought to the brink of civil war by ethnic tensions between Macedonians and Albanians. These successive crises promoted the image of a whole region in continuing turmoil, even though the worst was over by 1995.

This pessimistic view did at least have one redeeming quality. It allowed outsiders to hope that, when peace was restored across the region, everything else would start to come right. Economic recovery would provide the foundations on which durable and free-standing democracies could be built. But now peace has indeed been restored, and yet the good news more or less ends there. Economic recovery has been patchy, and has not yet led to irreversible and locally rooted political change in most of the region.

The International Commission on the Balkans, a non-governmental body of experts led by Giuliano Amato, a former Italian prime minister, published a report in April that gloomily reflected:

The region is as close to failure as it is to success. For the moment, the wars are over but the smell of violence still hangs heavy in the air...Economic growth in these territories is low or non-existent; unemployment is high; corruption is pervasive; and the public is pessimistic and distrustful towards its nascent democratic institutions.

The Foreign Investors' Council of Serbia sounded only slightly less bleak when it published its annual White Book on business conditions in March. On paper things might be looking better, it said, but:

The adoption of laws without implementation and enforcement achieves little...[The] momentum which Serbia's transition process had gathered in earlier years has now dissipated.

There are patches of relative optimism here and there. This year the International Monetary Fund praised as “remarkable” and “commendable” the economic performance of Albania, where real incomes have doubled since 1998. Macedonia's constitutional order has been looking more robust since voters allowed a new law on local government to pass late last year. But by and large, the coming of peace to the Balkans has merely allowed the deep problems of state weakness, and of incomplete state-building projects, to be seen more clearly.

The “open status” issues of Kosovo and Montenegro obstruct the normalisation of political life in Serbia, the western Balkans' biggest country, and thus overshadow the whole region. International talks on the future of Kosovo, which legally is still part of Serbia, are due to begin later this year and may well lead to eventual independence. The future of Montenegro may be decided by a referendum next year. The choice is between independence on the one hand and the status quo—a loose federation with Serbia—on the other.

Outsiders hoped and assumed a few years ago that peace in the Balkans would free people in the region to concentrate on economic development. Voters would push leaders to worry much more about raising living standards and much less about re-opening quixotic and violent national questions. Why have things not turned out quite that way?

Part of the problem is that, even in times of peace, the power and assets of a weak state are still up for grabs, especially if the state has been federalised and if the constitutional order has not been entrenched beyond any expectation of change. The country will be restless, communities will compete, the rule of law will be fragile, the government will be fractious, private investment will be risky. So it is across the Balkans. Whatever the final constitutional order is going to be for any of these countries, the important thing is that its finality should be obvious to everyone, and universally accepted.

No loose ends

That is one argument for giving independence to Kosovo and Montenegro now. Independence for both would have an air of finality about it which a loose federation or a special jurisdiction never could. Separation would allow those new countries, and Serbia, to concentrate on the quotidian business of economic reconstruction, and of capacity-building in government, without national questions to distract them, and with nobody else to blame for their problems.

Opinion polls show that most communities in the Balkans are ready to accept the sort of order which most western governments would like to see installed there. This would mean independence for Kosovo, probably in stages, severing it from Serbia but denying it union with Albania. It would mean independence for Montenegro. And it would mean making the best of Bosnia as a hybrid state, half run by Serbs and half by Bosniaks and Croats.

Fears that independence for Kosovo might inspire fresh independence struggles among Serbs in Bosnia and Albanians in Macedonia may be exaggerated. Polls show that Bosnia is no longer what the Amato commission calls a “highly contested state”. Most Serbs in Serbia, and almost half the Serbs within Bosnia, do not want to break Bosnia up and join its Serb half with Serbia. Across the region, there is a consensus view that Serbia and Montenegro will probably go their separate ways (even though most Montenegrins currently want to keep the status quo), and that this separation will be a good thing.

Most Macedonians strongly reject the idea of dividing Macedonia into Macedonian and Albanian statelets, and joining the Albanian part of it with Albania itself. Albanians are very slightly in favour of it, but most do not think it will happen. The one possible upset is over the question of joining Albania with an independent Kosovo. Kosovo Albanians are keen on the idea, Albanians in Albania just about in favour, and both think it is more likely to happen than not.

If the commission and its polls are right, therefore, the public mood in the Balkans may be ready for some big steps forward. The acquiescence of the Serbian government in Belgrade will be the key to a peaceful break-up of the country and its approval by the United Nations. If the government in Belgrade objects, then China and Russia will probably take its side in the UN Security Council, blocking progress and perhaps provoking fresh unrest in Kosovo. The question is how to win Serbia over. Probably the only answer is by giving it a faster track towards EU membership.

The next question is whether the EU is ready for that. If that strategic bargain can be struck, then it will become harder to deny the remaining countries of the Balkans a fast track too. Otherwise, what will be left there? A sink of countries seemingly unable to generate the hope and confidence needed to trust their own governments, let alone the neighbouring ones, and obliging the rest of the world to keep them in order and in funds. On a per-head basis, the world has put 25 times as much money and 50 times as many troops into Kosovo as it has put into post-conflict Afghanistan. The aid the EU has given to the Balkans in recent years dwarfs the amounts given to other countries on its borders (see table 3).

Croatia's credentials

The road to EU membership is currently being explored by Croatia, which finished its territorial war and its ethnic cleansing in 1995. The completion of those projects, followed by the death in 1999 of the country's veteran leader, Franjo Tudjman, allowed a line of sorts to be drawn between wartime Croatia and its post-war continuation. Croatia re-cast itself as a more or less liberal democracy where nationalism had been tamed, a country still a little rough round the edges but ready and willing in principle to form part of a peaceful and orderly Europe, a place where “moderate nationalists could provide a soft landing for exhausted or failed nationalist projects”, in the words of Jacques Rupnik, a French political scientist.

But Croatia exaggerated the depth of its transformation for foreign consumption, and perhaps ended up believing some of its own publicity. It thought, wrongly, that other European countries were so keen to put the ghosts of the Balkan wars behind them that they would forgive Croatia's failure to co-operate fully with the United Nations war-crimes tribunal in The Hague. The tribunal's most wanted fugitives include Ante Gotovina, a Croat general charged with ethnic cleansing during Croatia's war with the Serbs. Carla del Ponte, the tribunal's chief prosecutor, said the Croats could do much more to help find him; the Croats said they had no idea where he was.

That was enough to derail Croatia's hopes of opening talks with the EU in mid-March. The EU postponed them the day before they were due to start, mainly at the urging of Britain, and over the objections of Austria and Hungary. The right outcome would be a reform of Croatia's intelligence services and special police to sack or demote those responsible for shielding Mr Gotovina. Even if that does not produce the man himself, it would at least show that the elected government had gained full authority over the state security services, which in March was still far from clear.

Croatia can scarcely afford to drag its feet. The job of reforming its public administration and its economy looks like at least five years' hard work. The state controls too much and delivers too little. Public spending accounts for fully half of GDP. Public debt rose from 30% of GDP in 1995 to 55% in 2003. External debt doubled from 41% of GDP in 1997 to 82% in 2003. Key health indicators are far below EU averages. Half the beneficiaries of social assistance are able-bodied but unemployed. Only 60% of adults have had more than eight years of schooling.

Working in Croatia's favour are two main factors. By the standards of EU candidates it is relatively rich, with a GDP per head of $7,700 last year, more than twice the level in Bulgaria or Romania. And it has a beautiful Adriatic coastline, making it a favourite holiday destination for millions of Europeans, a sentimental factor not to be underestimated. It can be hopeful of EU entry by, say, 2010 if only it can solve the Gotovina problem (and, of course, if the EU is still in business then).

But the graduation of Croatia from the badlands of the Balkans to the safe haven of the EU will only increase the sense of isolation and abandonment across its hinterland. The International Commission on the Balkans proposes a general solution that is admirable in its detail and its directness. It says that Kosovo should be launched on a phased transition towards full independence and sovereignty, for the first few years of which the international community would reserve powers over human rights and minorities. Once that was agreed, and Montenegro had decided whether to stay with Serbia or go it alone, the EU should convene a Balkan conference in 2006 and give each country its road map to membership.

Macedonia would be invited to start EU accession talks by the end of that year. Serbia and Montenegro, as one or two countries, would also be invited to start negotiations or, failing that, would be offered a “Europe Agreement” similar to those given to central European countries before they began negotiations. Albania would be offered the same sort of deal, and invited to join NATO. The powers of the Office of the High Representative in Bosnia would be transferred to the European Commission in Brussels, and vested in an EU accession negotiator there. The hope would be that all these processes could be completed, and the EU enlarged into the Balkans, by 2014. Europe's present mood does not favour that outcome, but it is hard to think of one that might work better.

The solution proposed by the Amato commission mixes practicality with romance, optimism and desperation. Probably all those things are needed in equal measure if the Balkans are ever to be helped to help themselves.

23 comments:

Anonymous said...

"This year the International Monetary Fund praised as “remarkable” and “commendable” the economic performance of Albania, where real incomes have doubled since 1998."

Pretty impresive starting from 0, who knows where Albania would have been without loosing all the progress made from 91 to 97, but I think the lessons learned in the pyramid scheme incident was a good and helpfull thing (personall opinion). Kosovo will follow the same economic progress with full independence and of course a large presence of Kfor and UN to make the transition smoother.

On another note, give Serbs their fast track to EU. I would suggest U.S. give Kosovo and Albania a sort of "Porto-Rico" relation, I can guarantee that Albanians would preferr that over joining the EU anytime of the day (yet again another personal opinion). This would enflame the EU nations though, having a U.S. type collony in their front lawn, but who cares about them anyway, throughout history they allowed the Albanian people to be stomped on. Without the U.S. intervention the same would have happend in 99. I love EU but its sad that they dont like us back.

Anonymous said...

That's true, its a lovely place, France, Italy, Spain, all these EU countries, but why on earth do they side with murderers?

Puerto Rico style agreement sounds goood...as long as we dont get sent to Iraq :P

Anonymous said...

That's true, its a lovely place, France, Italy, Spain, all these EU countries, but why on earth do they side with murderers?

Puerto Rico style agreement sounds goood...as long as we dont get sent to Iraq :P

Anonymous said...

As you know the EU consists of many states and it's hard to define a common policy when there so many states involved.
But apart from that I'm convienced that the future of Kosova and the Balkans lays in the EU. The decision makers in the EU know very well that they cannot afford another failure neither moraly nor financial.
After all the EU is more affected what is going on in this region than the US.

Anonymous said...

EU and morals in the same sentence is an oxymoron. Don’t expect EU to want to avoid another moral failure, their policies are based on failing other states to secure their own markets out of competitors. I believe Albanians should secure their own future before they look to the EU with any admiration. EU is nothing to admire because its core existence is based on an exclusive, aristocratic, and complex idea. Who wants to join a Union where even most lawmakers cannot understand its Constitution? The Constitution is for the people not for the few lawmakers that devised it. It is a lost cause.

Canadese said...

Unfortunately Kosovo and Albania have become a drug and prostitute trafficers paradise which is leading them away from Europe instead of towards it. Kosovar politicians in particular have failed to undertake the internal political reforms which are necessary for any kind of meaningful EU partnership. They have failed to understand that their form of ethnic nationalism is dead. Forget separtism. Instead of distancing themselves from their neighbours they should be actively finding ways to cooperate on political and economic reforms. If that means finding a politically balanced way to reintegrate their economy with Serbia/Montenegro then so be it. There is no question that this would take tremendous politcal courage and maturity but it would be the right thing to do for the region. The Balkans need more movement towards integration if they are going to get the region back on its feet.

Anonymous said...

Its funny, you speak as if we were independent, claiming we have everything in our hands, and by this you try to oppose independence, since you argue we have failed in all those things.

So which one is it?

We need to stand on our feet befor ewe can integrate (thus independence is needed), otherwise we will fail in every attempt to integrate with Europe

Chris Blaku said...

Few things-

1) The country is not yet independent

2) Kosovar politicians, who you blame without reason, have little control over the province, the UN has it all

3) Albania was cited as the sole Balkan example of capitalist success by the World Bank, as real incomes doubled from 1998 to 2005, on par with a successfully expanding democracy.

Stop reading Serbian newspapers and propaganda and open your eyes to the realities. Nationalism is portrayed by the Serbians a lot more so than by the Albanians, who have been working defensively for the past 100 years against the Serb and Greek occupiers.

Anonymous said...

Yeah Canadese, stop reading those Serbian newspapers and open your eyes to Albanian nationalist propaganda. We're doing so well economically that our crack and heroine revenues have nearly doubled year over year from 2001-2005. We're constantly bringing in new field sales guys who we pay on a commission basis, and we've opened up 23 new brothels in Kosovo. The EU said that if we can achieve 30% growth in crack/prostitution sales over the next year, they will consider us for the accession process.

Anonymous said...

The above poster is a pissed off blogger :( or shall i say a Serb blogger..or serb biased blogger.


"Unfortunately Kosovo and Albania have become a drug and prostitute traffickers paradise which is leading them away from Europe instead of towards it"

- I can identify this one as a Serb from hundreds of miles away (the same pattern of Milosevic brainwashing methods)



"Instead of distancing themselves from their neighbours they should be actively finding ways to cooperate on political and economic reforms"

- You find that Kosova has very nice relations with Albania, Macedonia, Montenegro, Croatia, Slovenia and so on. Its only Serbia that its distancing itself from Kosova and not the other way around. If you want to act like you own my house then of course i am not going to welcome you. However, I will try and buy you a coffee in a coffee shop!!!!!!




"Kosovar politicians in particular have failed to undertake the internal political reforms which are necessary for any kind of meaningful EU partnership"

- Believe me considering the fact that they are working against one of the scummiest (Belgrade) governments on earth, they are doing very well indeed. Serbian government everyday is working planes to try and destabilise the country and prevent the progress that is being made. Furthermore, Kosova has a very strong government and opposition, which you can not say about the Serbia (allies of Milosevic and radicals control their government)


"If that means finding a politically balanced way to reintegrate their economy with Serbia/Montenegro then so be it"

- Why do you think Kosovar economy is in trouble. After years of Belgrade mismanagement and corruption, expulsion of Albanian workers from their jobs (creating thousands of unemployed- an economic way of ethnically cleansing Kosova from Albanians), closure of Albanian Schools and Universities, prosecution of the Albanian businessman and politicians. This are the main factors that have brought Kosovar economy down to zero the. What makes you way is the solution of Kosova's economy? Do you want to kill it off is that it?

“we've opened up 23 new brothels in Kosovo!!!”

- You speak of 23 new brothels being opened in Kosova as if that's supposed to be a terrible doing for a society. So bloody naive of you mate. Do you know how many brothels are opening up in Berlin in the next coming months? In Germany the world cup is being hosted next year. However, in Kosova as long as there are internationals of course there are gone be brothels. The brothels are legal and the law does not say otherwise. Do you know how many you have in Belgrade?


“We're doing so well economically that our crack and heroine revenues have nearly doubled year over year from 2001-2005”

- the crack and heroine revenues spare me the thought. Everybody knows that its a Serb financed market. If you look a bit further you might probably find the Serbian goverment being the godfather of the drug markets in the region. After all it was the Serbian mafia that killed the Serbian PM Dindjic, and took charge of Serbia.



"The EU said that if we can achieve 30% growth in crack/prostitution sales over the next year, they will consider us for the accession process"

- So desperate of you. Is that what is going on in Serbia?


As for the Albanian propaganda as you call it...What can i say i am a reader i do not work for the Kosovar or Albanian institutions. I am simply stating the facts.... You in contrast well what can I say you make me laugh (everything you write is propaganda in its purest meaning)

F....,UK

Chris Blaku said...

Serb- you started four wars in ten years, and lost them all. You have cost the Balkans a million lives, and have raped and killed the minds of millions of other young girls in your systematic chambersz of torture.

However your arrogant demonization of a people, the Albanians, who have done nothing but defend themselves and their sincere interests for years, does not go unnoticed. Believe it or not, in the end it will be your words and your actions that bury your people. And when that does occur, you will further your demonization to include the entire planet, as you already have begun to do, and you will refrain from ever blaming anyone but yourselves for the henious actions you have undertaken.

It was you Serbia, that painted yourself in this corner, not over your actions recently, but over the psyche and the mindset of your people, over a millenia.

It is time to pay for the suffering of the people of the Balkans, the Albanians especially, and the interest is just going to kill you.

Chris Blaku said...

It is important to recognize two factors, which may seem contradictory, yet are noteworthy regardless.

The progressive statements made within this piece, such as describing the obvious likely outcome of a conjoined Albanian state, is absolutely profound. The Economist deserves much praise in spearheading such belief and understanding, and helping break new ground in a subject that is riddled with ridiculous taboos.

On the other hand, it is important to note that the Economist refrains from only issuing blame towards the Serbians, who are acknowledged to be the chief architects of the massacres of the 1990's through their nationalistic aggression towards their neighbors. As time progresses, the media and the world has become softer and seems to have forgotten the demonic actions of the Serbian state. It is important that the people of the world do not forget what happened in the Balkans, instead of issuing collective guilt towards the entire group in the Balkans, and branding them uncivilized, the world must recognize the lack of compatability on the part of the Serbians with any sort of multi ethnic culture and understanding.
Furthermore, Europe needs to acknowledge that the actions of the Balkans in past decade are the direct result of the land siezures they hosted in 1878 and 1913. Europe does not get a clean slate with regards to their arrogance in their decision making in the 20th century, and it must be made apparent that their bigotry and ignorance has lead to this bloodshed, so they must bear the responsibility of cleaning up the mess they created, not inherited as they commonly portray. They must bear the financial responsibilities, for it is obvious their decision making role in the region should be limited, and should be lead by a more capable power, the United States of America- the very sybmol of justice and democracy in the world.

Anonymous said...

Blaku, stop smoking crack and start selling it. You have to do your part if you want incomes to keep doubling.

Corey Pedersen said...

I am from New York, and I've read from many sources that Bin Laden supports the KLA, that the KLA is a heroine-financed organization, that there are many links between al-Qaeda and Albania, etc. I've read some Serb propaganda, but a lot of it was also written by accredited journalists. It seems like a double standard that America would attack Iraq but support Albania, which has even more ties to terrorism.

Here's an example from the Washington Times: http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/7006/KLA-drugs.html

Anonymous said...

It's amazing how any criticism of Kosovo automatically gets shut down by a wave of abuse by Albanians with the taunt of "Serb" or Serbian proaganda. Being neither Serbian or Albanian I find this to be another example of parochial and "small country" thinking. Kosovo is not and will never be economically viable as a stand alone entity and to pretend otherwise or to continue to blame Serbia is unrealistic. The rest of the world has moved on it's time the Balkins did too. Kosovars were held up temporarily as the "matyred victims" by the USA as part of their power play in the region. But as subsequent studies have found, the Kosovar Albanians and their KLA were hardly lily white and their leaders are heading to the Hague as well. Move on.

canadese said...

It's amazing how any criticism of Kosovo automatically gets shut down by a wave of abuse by Albanians with the taunt of "Serb" or Serbian proaganda. Being neither Serbian or Albanian I find this to be another example of parochial and "small country" thinking. Kosovo is not and will never be economically viable as a stand alone entity and to pretend otherwise or to continue to blame Serbia is unrealistic. The rest of the world has moved on it's time the Balkins did too. Kosovars were held up temporarily as the "matyred victims" by the USA as part of their power play in the region. But as subsequent studies have found, the Kosovar Albanians and their KLA were hardly lily white and their leaders are heading to the Hague as well. Move on.

Anonymous said...

Finally some intelligent, impartial commentary. This blog needs it... Thanks Canadese.

Chris Blaku said...

Impartial commentary can be related to unfamiliar commentary within this argument. The fact of the matter is the situation between Albanians and their neighbors is not simple enough to resolve to stamping Albanians with labels, such as "small country thinkers" and "parochial" people, and then "moving on."

It is obvious that only a person unfamiliar with either side of the regions rich history can come to such a simplified conclusion, and only a bigot can even imagine branding human behavior in its entirety with a label.

The fact of the matter is Kosova is economically viable, as any further investigation into the history of the region will yield evidence towards this argument. The very reason Kosova was always strategically important was its ric mineral reserves, which is what prompted the Turkic Bulgars, Serbs/Rascians, Turks, Byzantines, Romans, as well as numerous other foreign conquerers to show extensiev interest and fight decisive battles over the region. The expansive cities in the former Yugoslavia, Zagreb, Sarajevo, Belgrade, and others are built on the backs of the Albanian people and the foreign exploitation of one of the most vast natural resource reserves in Europe.

Obviously, if the region were not rich there would not have been bloodshed over it, and moreover, Serbia would not be fighting tooth and nail over a territory this small. Furthermore, the fact that the Serbians themselves plotted to regain control of the region, and even conspired to arm and deceive the Albanians of the League of Prizren to remove the Ottomans so they themselves would assume control of the region, goes to show that the region is more than just strategically important, it is an economic goldmine and a lifeline that Serbia may starve without.

Numerous studies conducted by Serbians have shown the KLA to be terrorists, studies where the obvious bias is present. Ramush Haradinaj has been charged with war crimes, along with a handful other KLA commanders, compared with the dozens of Serbians charged and wanted. You should also consider that there are NO Albanians on America's list of terrorists, compared with dozens for Serbia.

In conclusion, ignorant reader, study the facts... Regardless of regional bias, I have presented you with the facts- as the old adage goes, you can lead a horse to water- but you cannot make it drink. It's up to you whether or not you choose to drink from the well of information or stay blind to the realities of the Balkans, as many have chosen to.

canadese said...

Sigh - each little community concludes that others have become rich off their backs - each little community is "entitled" to their own country justified by going back 100, 500, 1000 years to when they were a "great" power. Let's give the Kurds their own Kurdistan let's create a new boundary based on current migration paterns and create a "new" minority or group of now "foreign" interlopers to drive off. Let's stay small and weak (but play tough with the remaining Serbs, Turks, Gypsies, Macedonians). Let's not play in the modern economic world when we can retreat into nationalism. We may be poor but what finances we have can be put into building consulates and embassies around the world and then everyone will realize what a great people we are. Blaku every Balkan group can present their own history of the region as you well know. And I'm sure you're all very passionate about your truth and anyone who contradicts you is "ignorant". The nation state concept is a very twentieth century concept and it's time is already up. For small ethnically pure nations hoping for glory in the dying days of empire have arrived too late at the party. The game is already up. Tribal isolated mountain folk with traditional peasant cultures will be left behind. Good luck to you I hope you make a fortune exploiting your petty nationalism and pandering to the poor.

Chris Blaku said...

Perhaps each "little" community concludes that others have become rich off their backs-
however that petty conclusion does not reach its intended goal of disproving the claims of
all communities that have actually been robbed and exploited based on factual evidence.
Would you go as far as to claim that African Americans are merely a "little" community that
has been whining about being exploited?

Moreover, it is not the Albanians but the Serbians that are justifying their right to the land
based on old history and mythology. To base their illegal occupation of Kosova on a the
falsified facts of a battle that took place over 600 years ago is to be nationalistic and
irrational in every sense of the world. However, this modern and progressive world is what
allowed this illegitimate land claim to occur, in a time when nationalism was strong in the
world.

The Albanians may have been small and weak, but they maintained their identity despite
numerous foreign occupations and forced assimilation at every corner. Obviously, every group
can present their own history, yet factual history is something that is a bit harder to
falsify. I believe the structure and emotion portrayed in my writing goes to testify to the fact that I am passionate about Albanian arguments, but above all, I am passionate about revealing the truth that many have blinded from the world. However, anyone that contradicts me is not "ignorant", I would base their ignorance on a number of qualities, particularly their level of education with regard to this subject. There are many Serbian historians, who I would not call ignorant but perhaps misinformed. You my friend are, however, ignorant.

Albania does not play host to tribal, isolated mountain clans any longer, and traditional peasant does not play a role in Albanian society. Nationalism is not a twentieth century concept, as your foolish arguments are being repeated as they were once proclaimed by the same ignorant fools that drove the nail in Nationalism's grave prior to World War 2, which was caused by the newly resurfaced nationalism.

Nationalism cannot die, only be hidden or surpassed by another form of identity. In the case of Arab and Persian countries, religious identity supercedes national identity due to their common ancestry, however is still relevant and powerful in many senses.

Inform yourself on the history of the area, then bring up factual arguments because I have no time for theological bickering.

Anonymous said...

Ahh yea, the EU, they love u Alboans so much that they're deporting you back to KOSOVA at breakneck speed. Alboans have quadrupled the crime rate in europe over last 5 years and now the euros know what the serbs have been going through for centuries. Here in Hamburg, alboan crime is such an epidemic that people are now beginning to aquire small firearms from switzerland.
As far as EU goes, it's DEAD.. The French and Dutch(also sick of muslim and alboan thugz) just threw the first punch by rejecting "progressive" tyrants in Brussels. As far as Kosovo is concerned, we'll get it back, you can declare independance, bring in jihadists(as you're doing now), whatever, remember something though, TIME IS ON OUR SIDE NOT YOURS. Europeans are fed up with you, US is too busy getting its ass kicked up and down Iraq, so the western love affair with the KLA is gonna come to and end, and when it does, it may not be pretty.

Chris Blaku said...

To the poster who suggested that Albania has more ties to terrorism than Iraq, please look up and read pieces by Steven Schwartz. He is an esteemed author, expert on the Balkans, as well as an expert on Wahhabism, which is the militant form of Islam that Al-Quada follows.

Chris Blaku said...

Anonymous 12:22am: You sound like a fool, a pissed off fool.