Thursday, February 16, 2006

KOSOVO: COUNTDOWN TO INDEPENDENCE?

Notwithstanding the views of local Serbs, the signs are that talks on the future of Kosovo due to begin on Monday will almost certainly lead to some form of independence.

By Tim Judah in Gracanica and Pristina

Drive ten minutes from Kosovo's capital of Pristina and it feels like you are in a different world, or at least a different country. Suddenly, one language, one culture and even one religion have vanished. The music, car number plates, documents and money are all different. Welcome to Gracanica.

Ever since the end of the Kosovo conflict in 1999, Serbs have retreated into small enclaves across the province and an area in the north which abuts Serbia.

Most Serbs do not speak Albanian and they remain fiercely loyal to Serbia. They continue to use Serbian Dinars - the rest of Kosovo uses the euro - and they carry Serbian documents, while Kosovo's 1.8 million or so ethnic Albanians carry ones issued by the United Nations.

Gracanica, little more than a village, is centred around a magnificent medieval Orthodox church. Most Kosovo Albanians are Muslims. Symbolically, however, the gap between these two people is represented by their mobile phone networks.

Serbs talk to each other on a Serbian network. Because Kosovo is not (yet) an independent country, the Kosovo Albanian equivalent borrows the international prefix of Monaco. So, to talk to one another, a Serb and Kosovo Albanian must make an international call, even if they are close enough to see one another.

Over the last few weeks the opportunities to do even that have been diminishing. Kosovo's ethnic Albanian-run government has declared that the Serbian network is illegal and its transmitters are being turned off. This has come as a shock to the 100,000 or so Serbs that remain in Kosovo, but less of a shock than the message that was delivered recently by John Sawers, the political director of the British foreign office.

Meeting Kosovo Serb leaders on February 6 he told them, in unusually undiplomatic language, that the Contact Group, the main foreign powers that deal with the region, including Britain, France, the United States and Russia, had decided that Kosovo would soon be independent.

At the talks on Kosovo's future which begin on Monday in Vienna under the supervision of former Finnish president Martti Ahtisaari, he said, they and Serbia would have to fight hard for a good deal on autonomy and minority rights.

Such news should not have come as a surprise. After all, the messages had been clear for months. The Contact Group had already said that the solution for Kosovo had to satisfy the will of its people - and well over 90 per cent are ethnic Albanians who want nothing less than independence.

But, ever since 1999, Serbs in Gracanica and elsewhere appear to have lived in a dreamland, fed by stories from Belgrade, in which they expected that one day the Serbian flag would once more fly over Kosovo.

Vojislav Vitkovic is a teacher in Gracanica. "It was an extreme shock," he says, adding that discrimination against Serbs in Kosovo is such that, to his mind, the province "is a hypocrisy and not a democracy".

Asked if he will leave, if and when Kosovo becomes independent, he says that like his friends he has adopted a "wait and see" policy. He added that 70 per cent of Kosovo Serbs still do not believe that independence will happen.

Rada Trajkovic, a local Serb leader who was at the meeting with Sawers, says that it was a stormy event, but that it was not the first time a foreign emissary had told them that independence was coming. Why then had she not told her people this? "Because I am not a servant of the Serbian government."

"If the status of Kosovo has already been decided," she says, "what are we supposed to negotiate? Are we supposed to go, just to see how beautiful Ahtisaari is? "

The mood here is best summed up by Zivojin Rakocevic, the editor of the local radio station, who declares that everyone is "fatally depressed".

But they are clearly not giving up yet. In the restaurant where we meet we overhear a man who has come from Serbia lecturing local Serbian journalists. He is discussing bringing in broadcast transmission equipment to install here to create or bolster networks for Serbian radio or television to cover all the areas where Serbs live.

Down in Pristina the mood, unsurprisingly, is upbeat. Kosovo's president, Ibrahim Rugova died last month and coach loads of mourners are still coming to have their photo taken behind his tomb. But, contrary to expectations, the presidential succession was smooth.

Now says Ylber Hysa, an opposition deputy who is a member of the political group of the status talks team, minds are turning to the post-independence period. He says that local institutions need to be solidified because until now the province has been run on the basis of "permanent crisis management" and, as the UN mission leaves Kosovo, that needs to change.

Kosovo has huge economic problems, a chronic power shortage, high unemployment and weak rule of law. But all surveys have shown that Kosovo's young population is one of the most optimistic in Europe. And, with independence in sight, young people are even more hopeful. What is important now, says one student who asked to remain anonymous is just knowing, "that Serbia is off our backs for good."

But is it? In the wake of Sawers's declarations, Tomislav Nikolic, the leader of Serbia's nationalist Radical Party, has declared that he and Serbia's premier Vojislav Kostunica, have agreed that if Kosovo gets independence then it should be declared "occupied territory".

If that happens, then Serbia will, in effect, rip up its application forms for NATO and the European Union and return to being an embittered pariah of Europe. In any settlement, NATO troops will stay in Kosovo and the EU will take a role in helping to run it. Under those circumstances, with Serbia publicly committed to reconquering Kosovo, in which NATO and the EU would be part of the occupation forces, it would hardly be realistic to expect to continue the process of joining those organisations at the same time.

Such a policy might however be popular in Serbia and might even lead to the election of the Radicals as the next government. But the attitude of western diplomats is far from sympathetic. What if independence led to a Radical government in Serbia? "So what?" answers a diplomat close to the talks process in Vienna.

Tim Judah is a leading Balkan commentator and the author of "The Serbs: History, Myth and the Destruction of Yugoslavia" and "Kosovo: War and Revenge", both published by Yale University Press. Balkan Insight is BIRN's internet publication.

30 comments:

Anonymous said...

"So what?" He must have been an Englishman. I like that. :)

It's natural for Serbs to show that they are pissed. Who wouldn't when their whole national myth was based on Kosova?

But they are tired like everyone else in the Balkans and have to move on.

Anonymous said...

"Most Serbs do not speak Albanian and they remain fiercely loyal to Serbia"

Awesome, let's see in 20 years how much this ignorance will pay, when Albanian will be required at everything. When ambassador of England can speak Albanian and so can a lot of serbian leader so can these people. The more you do stupid stuff such as cry about no electricity and no telephones (HAHA) the more your giving the democratic world how pathetic your demands are. 70% of Serbs Believe Kosova will return to Serbia, wow, I knew Drug traffic was bad coming from Asia thru Turkey->Albania and Kosova and North up in europe but this is amazing, Remember kids... CRACK KILLS HAHAHA.

God Bless Independent Kosova

PS
I hope Shkijet claim as "unacceptable/unconstitutional" the independence and send tanks, I really hope so, if you want war then Nato will do some more target practacing.

fauna said...

amazing

Kristian said...

To: Anonymous

About the electricity and phones, its not really a funny matter. The infrastructure in Kosovo/a is horrible. Not just for serbs but all citizens of Kosovo/a. That is a fact!

Even if you don't like serbs, we still have to live with them. And you don't have to make fun of them with Satirical comments: ex. HAHA. I believe Albanians should be a bit more mature in this aspect.

They will have equal rights as any other individual or minority in Kosovo/a. And their churches will have to be protected. That is a fact!
(personal opinion: I still believe those churches were not all serb churches at one time or another in the past).

One concern serbs have is that their churches remain unharmed. They also need funding for repairs etc... Instead of Belgrade demanding control its easy for them to set up a fund raising campaign/endowment that would be controlled by their bishop or archbishop (I don't know who is the main head of the orthodox church in Kosovo/a). Basically a monetary fund that serbia could give into to keep those churches from dilapidating. The head of the church would be in control (trustee) and could appropriate funds as necessary (not the Belgrade govt). Very simple solution.

Belgrade could do this with other areas of concern as well. But they wouldn't have direct control. The citizens (serbs) would expropriate funds as they seem fit. This would relieve the Kosovo/a govt. from responsibily in some areas (not all), but they still must protect serbs their identity, culture, etc. NGO's should be welcomed by all ppl in Kosovo/a no matter what ethnicity they happen to be.

School, culture, etc.. could also be funded by NGO's from serbia. I'm sure school textbooks that teach serbian would have to be the same as serbian from serbia. Just as albanian is with our neighboring countries where albanians live.

Note: books promoting propaganda or hate would have to be reviewed by the educational committee of Kosovo/a which would include serbs and albanians.

Some of these suggestions, mind you, are not to promote divisions in govt. and policies. The countries govt. should be decentralized to the local level.

There are many problems in Kosovo/a. FACT! Even with independence there is a lot of work to be done. Employment is a big problem that needs to be tackled head on. Investments in the region are not guaranteed. So ppl have to wake up to the reality that no job means no income (then we can't blame serbs but ourselves (govt. etc..).

Electrical and telephones services (just to name a few) will be cut off to all citizens if they don't pay. It won't be the same as the pre war (communist) era. In a democracy nothing is free and those individuals that died didn't die in vain to gain independence.

The west is not going to just hand us money either. People will invest only if they know they can make a profit, if not then they WILL NOT DO SO. People will have to pay taxes to market values, not what they were used to. The govt. will need money to operate and pay for the police, govt. services, etc.. AGAIN NOTHING IS FREE.

illyrianboy said...

"So what?" answers a diplomat close to the talks process in Vienna.

Gotta say I loved this!

Kristian said...

Freedom comes at a price. A very steep price. Having freedom does not mean doing whatever you want whenever you want. Your freedom/rights END when you infringe on anothers freedoms/rights. Having freedom is not total freedom. This must be burned into the brains of all citizens of Kosovo/a.

I hope those individuals that gave up their lives didn't do so in vein. A democracy is a work in progress. Its never perfect! All citizens have to realize this and strive to make it better one day at a time.

Peace to all and a bright future to all. Again freedom is an expensive item and don't forget those that have passed that faught hard or worked hard (I.Rugova and common folk/soldiers).

To the Kosovans and their road to properity and everlasting PEACE!

illyrianboy said...

hey kristian,

i say dont worry nobody is gonna bother touching the serbian churches if we get independence. remember serbian churches were always guarded by albanians during ottoman empire.

and off course they will be respected. after indepedence there will be no cause for division. people will have to live next to each other so they will not just hate each other.

Sami said...

I don't care what country one lives in, there will always be groups of people who do not like one another. This is natural, and historically, unavoidable. The question is, will the qeveri of independent Kosova ensure that civil rights are being afforded everyone who lives in Kosova? Will my brothers and sisters Shqiptare resist the urge to take revenge on Serbs who live around them? This will be a huge test for our newly independent nation. At any rate, I am extremely happy that the Serbians who live in Kosova are finally seeing reality. It was wrong for the qeveri of Serbia to lie so much to the Kosovar Serbs, reinforcing their unrealistic delusion that Serbia would retake Kosova.

Elija said...

My goodness how ill informed most people are abut Kosovo and the Serbian Churches.

Can yu tell me how many Churches are already destroyed? Desicrated? How many Serb cemetaries are desicrated?
Ove 100 Churches destroyed.

One other thing, this was all prearranged during the Bosnian war. Can you say Camp Bondesteel(sp?)

And I love it ow this one anonymous person said"move on." To where?
I love it how that person also said" we have to live with them", no you don't, you're Albanian, live in Albania.

Elija said...

Illyrian boy,

>>> say dont worry nobody is gonna bother touching the serbian churches if we get independence. remember serbian churches were always guarded by albanians during ottoman empire.

and off course they will be respected. after indepedence there will be no cause for division. people will have to live next to each other so they will not just hate each other.<<<<

Bother touching Serbian churches? Where in the hell have you been boy? And if "we" get independence you won't "touch" churches? My oh my how cavalier of you. And your people guarding the Serb churches during the Ottoman Empire? Lord have mercy--lol, how posively arrogant you are.
Can yu guarntee that if you get yoiur so called independence you will allow the Serbs who have lived there longer than you to get their homes back?
Yeah, just like the Croats will do in the Krajina.
Hate is a two way street.
Repair the Churches you desicrated and destroyed, then maybe somebody can trust you.
What people do not realize is IF Kosovo is given to the Albanians the repurcussions all over the Balkans will be devastating.

You heard it here first.

Anonymous said...

Elija, so were many mosques. What's your point, that churches are more valuable than mosques?
At least K-government has taken full responsiblity for failing to protect them and has offered money to the Serb church to rebuild them. What has Belgrade done in this aspect?

Anonymous said...

Kristian, it's this mentality that I laugh at.

"no you don't, you're Albanian, live in Albania."

I'm Kosovar, I'll live in Independent Kosova. I for one am against the serbian churches, and the chetnics. You can't tell me that these 'servants of GOD" are holy when they go and preach to me Albanians are Devils bullcrap.

So Elia, if Serbs don't want to face the reality that Independent Kosova will be free from all force of Serbia and that SERBS can't change anything because they are a minority, and getting a job won't be as easy as SERB,yes, you got it...then they can live peacefully.

You Serbs keep bullshitting about churches, what about all those mosques burned, I'd like to see 1 being paid by your "GREAT" government to reconstruct it.

Mir said...

"What has Belgrade done in this aspect?"

What can you do? Paying money can lift up the walls that fell but it dosen't bring back 600 years of history the building before it held.

Mir said...

"You can't tell me that these 'servants of GOD" are holy when they go and preach to me Albanians are Devils bullcrap."

Of course thats completely insane! Everyone knows it is the Serbians that are Devils.

Dardania 2006 said...

Mir,

Only those that call for destruction of Albania and Kosova.

Just like that wheasle from Iran, that guy makes me laugh but sometimes I just wana throw him to the teletubbies (eternal plight)

Anonymous said...

More than 200 Albanian mosques were burned down by the Serbian military. Doesn't that history count? To a Serb mind it doesn't.Catholic Albanian churches were turned into Serbian churches. Why don't you count that.

Mir said...

Yes they do count, by they were destroyed by an ARMY that on top of that was under Milosevic.

Those Serbian churches were destroyed by the common people not an army. It foreshadows what will happen if Kosovo is independent and the power is with the common people.

Dardania 2006 said...

Mir,

That is not entirely correct. In my neighbourhood it was our Serb neighbours, not Army, that did all the "art works".

Milosevic had support from his people that cannot be denied, and when things turned sour he was turned in to the Hague.

fauna said...

mir,
let's not have Kosova ruled by then common people
let's have a Sebian dictator and save the churches

gread idea!

Cvijus011 said...

Another pivotal Balkan moment
Christian Science Monitor, February 16, 2006

Christian Science Monitor By Gordon N. Bardos

NEW YORK - The death of Kosovo Albanian president Ibrahim Rugova late last month came at a particularly delicate time for the Western Balkans. Talks on Kosovo's future status begin on Monday, but many observers fear that a power struggle among pretenders to Rugova's mantle, together with similar political infighting in the Serbian capital of Belgrade, will inhibit both the Albanians' and the Serbs' ability to negotiate coherently or constructively over the coming months.

Kosovo's Albanians have made it clear that the United Nations, which has governed the disputed Serbian province since 1999, has outstayed its welcome, and that hostility toward the Serbs may soon be directed toward the UN and NATO if Kosovo does not quickly gain independence. Consequently, driven partly by fear of extremist violence, and partly by the need to resolve Kosovo's international-legal limbo status, the Bush administration has decided to push for a resolution of the Kosovo issue in 2006.

Granting Kosovo independence outright, however, is not a straightforward matter. As Balkans' expert Alex Grigor'ev recently noted, these negotiations are as much about Serbia as they are about Kosovo. More than five years after the fall of Slobodan Milosevic, Serbia's democratic transition is making progress, but the progress is not irreversible. The worst-case scenario runs along the following lines: An independent Kosovo prompts democratic leaders in Serbia to resign. In the ensuing "who lost Kosovo" electoral campaign, extreme nationalists with a revanchist political agenda come to power. With Serbia being, as Assistant Secretary of State Nicholas Burns has noted, "the most important country in the Balkans," political and economic reform throughout much of southeastern Europe would suffer if political forces from the 1990s came back to power in Belgrade.

US policy is therefore stuck between the proverbial rock and a hard place. Failing to quickly fulfill the aspirations of Kosovo's majority population could lead to yet another insurrection involving the US military. Fulfilling those aspirations, however, without regard to their broader ramifications could produce an entirely new set of problems. And there are broader ramifications aplenty, for whatever happens in Kosovo could have considerable impact in the Balkans and beyond.

Russian President Vladimir Putin recently said that "universal principles" should be applied in Kosovo, leaving open the possibility that Moscow could some day invoke the Kosovo precedent to support the claims of its clients in similar territorial disputes, such as those in the Georgian regions of South Ossetia or Abkhazia, or Moldova's breakaway province of Transdniestria. In fact, the Kosovo precedent could affect a host of similar problems around the world: If Kosovo Albanians can secede from Serbia, then why not Albanians in Macedonia from Macedonia? Or Croats and Serbs from Bosnia-Herzegovina? Or Nagorno-Karabakh Armenians from Azerbaijan? Or Turks from Cyprus? Or Kurds from Iraq and Turkey?

Clearly, these issues must be considered carefully. In 1991-92, the international community thought that it could control and contain the processes of the former Yugoslavia's disintegration. We now know how terribly wrong that assumption was, and we should not make such a mistake again.

With so much at stake, success in Kosovo requires quiet, patient diplomacy - not imposed, quick-fix solutions. It also requires an agreement that can reconcile the demographic and political reality of today's Kosovo, comprised of an Albanian majority persecuted during the 1990s, with Serbia's historical, religious, and legal claims to the province. Granting Kosovo independence outright would mean that the international community had sanctioned the territorial dismemberment of a sovereign democratic state.

A lasting solution therefore requires a paradigm shift in the way Albanians, Serbs, and the international community approach the problem. Framing the negotiations as a zero-sum game involving winners and losers won't work.

Instead of understanding Kosovo's future in terms of 19th-century notions of state sovereignty, the international mediators and responsible politicians in the Balkans should facilitate a future for Kosovo in keeping with the soft borders and limited, overlapping sovereignties that have become the basis for the European Union of the 21st century.

Such an agreement will not be easy to achieve. It will require imaginative diplomacy, difficult compromises and concessions, and courageous political leadership. But this is a rare historical opportunity to "get it right" in the Balkans. For the first time in decades (if not centuries), southeastern Europe is not divided by rival power blocs, and all the peoples in the region share the same domestic and foreign policy goals - developing the democratic institutions and market economies that can one day join the EU.

Hopefully, the politicians and diplomats guiding this process will find the vision and the courage to exploit this historical moment to the fullest.

Gordon N. Bardos is assistant director of the Harriman Institute at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs. He also serves as a Balkans analyst for Freedom House.

Dardania 2006 said...

Anndd Cvjius goes for a desperate attempt!!!!

...


He scoreeeessssss!!!!!!! This is a homee runn!!!!

You need chocolate ice cream ;)

Kristian said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Kristian said...

To: Mir

.........Yes they do count, by they were destroyed by an ARMY that on top of that was under Milosevic.

Those Serbian churches were destroyed by the common people not an army. It foreshadows what will happen if Kosovo is independent and the power is with the common people........



The army is the common ppl mindyou! And you can't pin everything on Milosevic. He was the leader but there were others that made orders and executed them. THEY ARE STILL IN POWER!

And the biggest supporters of Milosevic are K-serbs. And they still believe that he never committed any autrocities. They were the ppl on the ground informing the army of positions etc... So they were as much a part of it as the guote un quote ARMY! They pillaged burned raped etc as much as the army did. That is why the majority left when the army left! WHY IS THAT?

There are a lot of NGO's rebuilding all those churches that were destroyed (AND WHEN WE SAY DESTROYED WE DON'T MEAN TOTALLY! THE PROPER WORD IS DAMANGED). What has the Serbian govt. done to repair the MOSQUES! I'm catholic and I think the distruction of the HOUSE OF GOD is wrong be it a church or mosque. If you look at the number of churches (not all churches were serb at one time or another in the past) and mosques: there were more mosques destroyed then churches.

OH bc they were serbian they have more relevance? Is that what you are inferring.

A church or mosque have the same relevance. They are both the HOUSE OF GOD! Maybe you've forgotten that. But your hatred towards muslims shows your irrelevance in this world.

You can't stand the fact that Albanians will be in control and that they are of a different faith.

What have the serbs in B&H done to repair the mosques they destroyed there? NOT A DAMN THING! Look into your own backyard of destruction before you accuse others of what THEY MIGHT DO!

To: Elija


How many of those churches were built post 1980's????


An example the one in Gjokova/ica in the town center! There was no church there pre 90's.

A lot of churches were built by the govt. to show that they have a claim on Kosovo/a through their religious ties to it. A great way to fortify their claim to it.

..... Serbs who have lived there longer than you to get their homes back?............

That is questionable and you claim that as a fact. Slav's didn't exist in the region prior to the 6-7th century. And you didn't own the territory for over 500yrs prior to the 1900's.

Those ppl that left still have their properties and they're houses have been rebuilt (not all), but bc of no running water, etc..(which they didn't have before) they don't want to enter them. What has the serbian govt done for its refugees in SERBIA? NOT MUCH as build them one HOUSE!


........Repair the Churches you desicrated and destroyed, then maybe somebody can trust you.
What people do not realize is IF Kosovo is given to the Albanians the repurcussions all over the Balkans will be devastating. ......


The churches are being repaired. They are working on laws to protect them. So trust is not an issue, but your hate towards albanians.

Macedonia is a great example to the second part of your claim. Albanians and Macedonians have learned how to co-exist with the Ohrid agreement. The country works fine and both sides are happy! Its not a perfect system but their both working hard to make it function as best as possible.

NOTE: they might be the first country to join the EU in our part of the world. GUESS WHAT: THERE IS A LARGE POP.OF ALBANIANS IN MACEDONIA and all macedonians are making it happen.

To: Anonymous

....Anonymous said...
Kristian, it's this mentality that I laugh at....


Not clear but who's mentality are we talking about?

Mir said...

"But your hatred towards muslims shows your irrelevance in this world."

Do you believe it is wrongly misplaced? After 9/11? After Nick Berg video and other similar videos? Please, dont try to be politically correct. I am not racist at all and lived in the Middle East for 6 years, but there is good reason the entire world has problems with them.

Anonymous said...

Mir, there are 1.2 billion Muslims. According to this theory you agree to people here that say every Serb is a criminal because they supported Milosevic?
Btw, I have problems with Orthodox Christians ;).

bela zora said...

to illyrianboy

...i say dont worry nobody is gonna bother touching the serbian churches if we get independence. remember serbian churches were always guarded by albanians during ottoman empire....

is this some joke?
cause i really laughed....
everybody could see how you guarded serbian churches on 17-20 march 2004. if you forgot - look here:

http://www.kosovo.com/default2.html

(click on "golgotha" and "churches in ruins")


ps. i do hope the world will finally realize all your lies, and i hope that day will come soon....

Kristian said...

To: bela zora


The serb govt. was the law and protector of all cultures prior to nato entering Kosovo/a.

WHY DID THE ARMY/ PARA MILITARY/ K-SERBS DESTROY SO MANY MOSQUES, WHICH OUTNUMBERED THE CHURCHES DAMAGED BY THE 2004 INCIDENT AND PRIOR?


To: Mir

So why do you make so many comments that have racist overtones?

...I am not racist at all and lived in the Middle East for 6 years,

You're sayint that albanians/Kosovo/a is the middle east bc of its large muslim population. You've already preconceived that albanians are inferior bc of their religion. So for the last 6 years Kosovo/a is another terrorist realm bc the majority are muslim. And you say your not racist? Gotta wonder how you define racism.

Mir said...

"You're sayint that albanians/Kosovo/a is the middle east bc of its large muslim population. You've already preconceived that albanians are inferior bc of their religion. So for the last 6 years Kosovo/a is another terrorist realm bc the majority are muslim. And you say your not racist? Gotta wonder how you define racism. "

I'm saying Kosovo is a threat to Europe IF they become influenced by Islam EXTREMISM like some of the other Islamic nations have. There is good reason in some people's minds to have fear/hate of this.

I doubt this will happen since Albanians have much more European values than the other Islamic extremists in the world but that does not mean the potential threat should be ignored. I didn't mean to come off as racist at all and if I did I apologize.

Anonymous said...

we all have seen how the serbian way of running the government in kosovo worked and it was not successful because people were not happy from either side with one another for whatever reason, but the kosovars still remained in Kosovo unemployed and under a corrupt serbian leadership which finally led to a devastating war. Nevermind the churches and the mosques that were burned down to the ground, this time around when the Kosovas-albanians should be given the chance to independence and let them run the government and see if they are just as corrupt, better or worse than the serbs. If the serbian minority in Kosovo or the albanian kosovars are unhappy for whatever reason it will lead to another war again, which of course is the easiest choice for both sides.

Anonymous said...

i dident see the new flag yet, im happy for kosova i am albanian, whenever i tell people about kosovo they r all like what is that? im like it's goin' to b a country, independent kosova means no more lights goin' out in the houses!hahaha♥♥♥