Tuesday, December 27, 2005

FINI: INDEPENDENCE FOR KOSOVO POSSIBLE IF CONDITIONS ARE MET

is possible provided that specific conditions are met. Fini stressed the need for Italy to play an active role in the region and the outcome of the talks on the region's status can contribute so much to its stability. Kosovo is a Serbian province in which a majority of ethnic Albanians live and is currently administered by the United Nations. (AGI) -

7 comments:

Prince of Albania said...

We know al too well by now that the West (UK and US) have decided (forced the rest of these colonial countries) to finally accept an Independent Kosovo, albeit conditionally.
Now we have to be smart politically and not let the Serbs hijack this process. We need to make sure that whatever the internal makeup of Kosova will be, there will be no division, neither soft nor defined, on ethnic basis.
If Kosova is to be a strong and prosperous state we need to make sure that all citizens enjoy maximum rights but without compromising our territorial integrity and state authority over the whole of the territory of Kosova.
If we play this right, and the west does not give in too much into Serbian demands just so they would get a deal, we could end up with a great solution.
An Independent, Sovereign State of Kosova built on Democratic Principles.
Good luck brothers and sisters. I hope we don't get screwed again like we have been so many times before in history.

illyrianboy said...

Duhet me bo presion ma shume te lideret tane. Krejt problemi o se lideret si kemi kerka hiq. Cfar men kan ata e hupin edhe pavarsine. Keshtu qe duhet ni fushate presioni.

Joe Napalm said...

Someone please explain to me how a fully-independent Kosovo (Kosova) will operate.

A few key questions that I have:
1. Will Kosovo overcome the import/export defecit?
2. Where will Kosovo turn for electricity?
3. After independence, how will the Kosovo government deal with the vacuum that will be created to draw in armed insurgents and extremists?
4. Serbia will definitely mass military troops along the border. How will Kosovo finance a defense infrastructure?

arianit said...

1. Will Kosovo overcome the import/export defecit?

Nobody knows. But we now for certain that under Serbia and in limbo in the past six years it hasn't. There is nothing to lose. The claim by Belgrade and some Western politicians that Kosova needs Serbia economically is misguided at best; Serbia treated Kosova as a colony when it had it, does anybody seriously expect Belgrade to invest now that it has lost it?

2. Where will Kosovo turn for electricity?

Obilic. Kosova is rich in lignite and it's expected to supply the region with electricity, too. That is, when its status is resolved so that financing flows for the building of the new power plants.

3. After independence, how will the Kosovo government deal with the vacuum that will be created to draw in armed insurgents and extremists?

There won't be massive changes overnight. Kosova has already been safe for most of its people (Serbs being an exception) and the situation can only improve. There will be less politically generated tensions and more foreign investments, hence better security and some more investment. Local security institutions, unrestricted by legal issues, will finally get a real shot at providing security through the establishment of intelligence and counter-intelligence agencies, serious weapons, control of borders, etc. Serbia, with its status defined, will not have any reason to interfere in the security of Kosova and won't have any reason to stop Serbs from participating in the Kosova security institutions.

4. Serbia will definitely mass military troops along the border. How will Kosovo finance a defense infrastructure?

Serbia has been building its own Bondsteel in the Presheva Valley for a long time now. But American Bondsteel and other NATO countries are expected to stay. In the long term I would say that something along the Swiss model could be done just in case Belgrade holds a grudge still. A stronger Albania and and a smarter Serbia in the EU will minimize this problem.


Rome wasn't build in a day.

Joe Napalm said...

Well put. Unfortunately, it appears that KFOR and UNMIK will be in Kosova for a long, long time. As an American citizen, it makes no sense to me. If I had foreigners in my backyard, I'd want them out tomorrow.

I agree that a smarter Serbia in the EU will benefit the region tremendously. But I'm not so sure about a "stronger" Albania. Until 1990 Albania had no formal communication with the US, so I'm ignorant on the politics and policies of Albania. I'll look into it.

Lolita said...

KFOR will indeed remain in Kosovo for a longer period of time, gradually reducing its troops while creating a more civilian task force (we are talking in years, as illiryanboy said - Rome was not built in a day)
As for UNMIK its failures and lack of concrete vision for Kosovo are widely acknowledged. Thus, it is not surprising that EU is seen as the last resort of export of soft-security in Kosovo (and the Balkans) through what EU does best - conditionality! So UNMIK will be out and EU led-mission in.
"If I had foreigners in my backyard, I'd want them out tomorrow." - Well US military is in the backyard of many countries - not least European ones, who are well developed but still chose to free ride in the US led security system (it is less windy under the umbrella of the military superpower) So Kosovo is not particular in this respect, the difference being that Kosovo did not chose itself to be under the umbrella, its unfortunate war made it fortunate in this respect. Kosovo does not have trade/economic ties with US as a bargaining point to be 'under the umbrella.' Quite the contrary, it is instability and a possibility of becoming a 'failed state'(one of the three security threats identified in the Solana paper in 2003)that keeps EU & US in. So it is this possibility for instability that keeps EU, respectively US, in our backyard. The true challenge is the choices they will make in facilitating the negotiations of the Kosovo independence.

Things are not always black & white!

Kristian said...

Being from the states and seeing a lot of money spent on the military and the many gripes that the rest of america has on such spending, I do hope the security forces stay a while in Kosova.

"If I had foreigners in my backyard, I'd want them out tomorrow."

Actually having them would benefit Kosovo/a a great deal. The politicians would worry less on this subject and really focus on important issues. Such as creating a fully functioning democracy that respects each individuals rights. Improving infrastructure and economic issues. (over 40% unemployment is a serious problem)(figure is not exact). If the country is economically viable then things improve and the ppl are more content.

And I do agree with the prince of albania:

"I hope we don't get screwed again like we have been so many times before in history. "

The serbs have stepped up their political campaign throughout Europe, the US and Asia to sway sympathy towards them. This could be dangerous if they succeed. They did it in the past and they will try to do it again. I hope the world realizes and remembers what happened in the '90's. For ppl do have a short attention span.

Illyrianboy:

You are 100% right. My grandfather taught me one thing when I was a child. He told me: "the pen is mightier then the fist".

Albanians throughout time have still not mastered this. You can be brave, have pride, and defend your honor through physical acts, but we never have persued this by the use of a pen. Writing to our legislative body and making sure that they're in line with what the ppl want and not what they think is right. Our politicians have to much pride and forget the will of the ppl. And the ppl should make sure that they are heard. Not just by voicing their opinions but by writting their opinions to their representatives.

As a ppl we never wrote to much and the world really doesn't know to much about us, except for what foreigners have written. And our neighbors have used this to their advantage. Lets stop that today and prove to the world who we are and remind them that democracy started in these lands before it had any roots in the west.